Writing Wrongs: Elizabeth Ortiz’s Story

Photo f Kristen Cervenak

Kristen Cervenak

Writing Wrongs is a journalistic magazine that features stories about social issues written by students. Last year’s issue, “Addiction: Stories of Hope”, contains interviews with residents at Easy Does It (EDI), an addiction recovery facility in Leesport, PA. The following is the summary of a piece that was originally produced for the magazine by Kristen Cervenak of Northampton Community College.

Cervenak interviewed Elizabeth Ortiz, who became an addict at the age of nine. She started with snorting cocaine to escape from the abuse she faced from her stepfather. Her drug problem snowballed from there, and by the time she turned 15 she was an IV heroin user. Ortiz was a functional addict for most of her life, but her struggles increased after she had put her children through school. This indomitable woman was able to commit to wellness after facing numerous pitfalls. At Easy Does It, she has finally found a healthier way to relieve her pain.

Click here to read more about how Ortiz overcame her lifelong struggle.

If you like what you read, use this link to support Writing Wrongs and HSI by purchasing a copy of the book.

Are you interested in joining the Writing Wrongs staff in 2017 to explore the topic of immigration? Writing Wrongs is looking for students from a variety of fields to participate in the project. Applications are open now and can be found here. The deadline to apply is May 1st.

Banner Photo: Portrait of Elizabeth Ortiz by Katelyn Bennett


Writing Wrongs: Tyler Kline’s Story

Writing Wrongs is a journalistic magazine that features stories about social issues written by students. Last year’s issue, “Addiction: Stories of Hope”, contains interviews with residents at Easy Does It (EDI), an addiction recovery facility in Leesport, PA. The following is the summary of a piece that was originally produced for the magazine by Chloe Schultz of La Salle University

At 19 years old, Tyler Kline is one of the youngest residents at EDI. His struggle with drugs began when he was 15, and persisted through a year of homelessness and one other treatment program. He arrived at EDI just two weeks before the interview after being asked to move out of his girlfriend’s house because of his drug habits. Tyler realized he needs to make a real change, and is now learning to care for himself and his environment.

Read more about Tyler’s transformation here.

You can also purchase the entire book here.

Are you interested in joining the Writing Wrongs staff in 2017 to explore the topic of immigration? Writing Wrongs is looking for students from a variety of fields to participate in the project. Applications are open now and can be found here.

Banner Photo: Portrait of Tyler Kline by Katelyn Bennett


Writing Wrongs: Angela Powell’s Story

Justin Sweitzer

Writing Wrongs is a journalistic magazine that features stories about social issues written by students. Last year’s issue, “Addiction: Stories of Hope”, contains interviews with residents at Easy Does It (EDI), an addiction recovery facility in Leesport, PA. The following is the summary of a piece that was originally produced for the magazine by Justin Sweitzer of Kutztown University.

Writing Wrongs 2016 Edition

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Sweitzer’s article, “Angela Powell Finds Chance for Redemption at EDI”, tells the story of a mother of three who just wanted to do what was best for her kids. “I just wanted to be supermom,” she told Sweitzer during her interview while describing what started her drug use. She had been trying to do it allworking full time while caring for her childrenwhen an injury lead her to painkillers and eventually alcohol. She found her way to Easy Does It after a chain of misfortune caused her to make an attempt on her own life.

You can read the full story of Angela’s redemption here

You can also purchase the entire book here.

Are you interested in joining the Writing Wrongs staff in 2017 to explore the topic of immigration? Writing Wrongs is looking for students from a variety of fields to participate in the project.

Applications are open now and can be found here.

Banner Photo: Portrait of Angela Powell by Katelyn Bennett