New Program: Great Girls Scholarship

Potential GTDF Scholarship winner sewing at fashion camp

GTDF hosts fashion camps where girls can learn design skills

Humanitarian Social Innovations is proud to introduce a new sponsored project; the Great Girls Scholarship. The scholarship is designed by The Great Taste Design Foundation “to help remove barriers and stumbling blocks for women and girls on their road to success and strengthening our communities.”

The Great Taste Design Foundation (GTDF) is part of the Great Taste Design Company, the brainchild of the multi-talented Mrs. De’Yanna Yancey-Harris. As an independent designer in the field, Mrs. Yancey-Harris felt the fashion industry was brimming with negative messages directed at young women. In 2007 she founded Great Taste Design Company to counteract that negativity through programs that teach young women important life skills such as leadership and self-advocacy.

The Great Taste Design Foundation awards the Great Girl Scholarship to talented girls between 7th and 12th grade in the state of Delaware. In order to win the award, the nominee must show outstanding performance in one of six areas: the arts, athletics, philanthropy, academics, leadership, or entrepreneurship. The award money can be used either for higher education and training or to further the girl’s entrepreneurial goals. Through this scholarship, Mrs. Yancey-Harris hopes to help young ladies “grow closer to their goals as well as be celebrated for their achievements.”

We can’t wait to see how the Great Girls help improve their communities, and are thrilled to be a piece of the puzzle.

Support the Great Girls Scholarship by donating today!                     Donate to Empower a Great Girl

You can learn more about the Great Girl Scholarship by visiting the Great Taste Design Foundation’s profile page.


Writing Wrongs: Elizabeth Ortiz’s Story

Photo f Kristen Cervenak

Kristen Cervenak

Writing Wrongs is a journalistic magazine that features stories about social issues written by students. Last year’s issue, “Addiction: Stories of Hope”, contains interviews with residents at Easy Does It (EDI), an addiction recovery facility in Leesport, PA. The following is the summary of a piece that was originally produced for the magazine by Kristen Cervenak of Northampton Community College.

Cervenak interviewed Elizabeth Ortiz, who became an addict at the age of nine. She started with snorting cocaine to escape from the abuse she faced from her stepfather. Her drug problem snowballed from there, and by the time she turned 15 she was an IV heroin user. Ortiz was a functional addict for most of her life, but her struggles increased after she had put her children through school. This indomitable woman was able to commit to wellness after facing numerous pitfalls. At Easy Does It, she has finally found a healthier way to relieve her pain.

Click here to read more about how Ortiz overcame her lifelong struggle.

If you like what you read, use this link to support Writing Wrongs and HSI by purchasing a copy of the book.

Are you interested in joining the Writing Wrongs staff in 2017 to explore the topic of immigration? Writing Wrongs is looking for students from a variety of fields to participate in the project. Applications are open now and can be found here. The deadline to apply is May 1st.

Banner Photo: Portrait of Elizabeth Ortiz by Katelyn Bennett


Writing Wrongs: Tyler Kline’s Story

Writing Wrongs is a journalistic magazine that features stories about social issues written by students. Last year’s issue, “Addiction: Stories of Hope”, contains interviews with residents at Easy Does It (EDI), an addiction recovery facility in Leesport, PA. The following is the summary of a piece that was originally produced for the magazine by Chloe Schultz of La Salle University

At 19 years old, Tyler Kline is one of the youngest residents at EDI. His struggle with drugs began when he was 15, and persisted through a year of homelessness and one other treatment program. He arrived at EDI just two weeks before the interview after being asked to move out of his girlfriend’s house because of his drug habits. Tyler realized he needs to make a real change, and is now learning to care for himself and his environment.

Read more about Tyler’s transformation here.

You can also purchase the entire book here.

Are you interested in joining the Writing Wrongs staff in 2017 to explore the topic of immigration? Writing Wrongs is looking for students from a variety of fields to participate in the project. Applications are open now and can be found here.

Banner Photo: Portrait of Tyler Kline by Katelyn Bennett


New Program: Health Care Development Association

HSI is proud to welcome the Healthcare Development Association (HCDA) to our ranks. HCDA is an organization dedicated to bringing health care clinics to the people of southern Haiti, where medical care is nigh impossible to access. Co-founder Kathleen Janvier began her career providing healthcare in the area of Le Rois 2011, and seeing the incredible health care deficit in the area inspired her and her fellow co-founder, Carlet Auguste, to begin funding clinics.

The need for accessible healthcare has escalated since Hurricane Matthew ravaged the coast of southern Haiti in the fall of 2016. The region is seeing outbreaks of cholera and malaria, and infection is certain to spread out of control if the people cannot get access to medical treatment. To remedy the situation, Janvier and Auguste would like to raise money to bring medical treatment and preventative health education to citizens of the Nippes region (where Le Rois is located). Janvier and Auguste plan to fundraise in areas of the United States with large Haitian populations in hopes that the struggles of their homeland will inspire people to give, as the HCDA founders themselves have been inspired.

We at Humanitarian Social Innovations look forward to assisting HCDA as they reach their full potential, and we can’t wait to see all the good they will do.

To learn more about HCDA, please visit their webpage.

Feeling inspired? Click here to donate.


Writing Wrongs: Angela Powell’s Story

Justin Sweitzer

Writing Wrongs is a journalistic magazine that features stories about social issues written by students. Last year’s issue, “Addiction: Stories of Hope”, contains interviews with residents at Easy Does It (EDI), an addiction recovery facility in Leesport, PA. The following is the summary of a piece that was originally produced for the magazine by Justin Sweitzer of Kutztown University.

Writing Wrongs 2016 Edition

Buy the book!

Sweitzer’s article, “Angela Powell Finds Chance for Redemption at EDI”, tells the story of a mother of three who just wanted to do what was best for her kids. “I just wanted to be supermom,” she told Sweitzer during her interview while describing what started her drug use. She had been trying to do it allworking full time while caring for her childrenwhen an injury lead her to painkillers and eventually alcohol. She found her way to Easy Does It after a chain of misfortune caused her to make an attempt on her own life.

You can read the full story of Angela’s redemption here

You can also purchase the entire book here.

Are you interested in joining the Writing Wrongs staff in 2017 to explore the topic of immigration? Writing Wrongs is looking for students from a variety of fields to participate in the project.

Applications are open now and can be found here.

Banner Photo: Portrait of Angela Powell by Katelyn Bennett